Economic Forensics & Analytics is an independent research and consulting firm located in Sonoma County, California. Since our conception in 2000, we’ve been dedicated to providing clients with customized economic analysis. We have a wide range of clientele in the private and public sectors throughout the state.

  • Rebuilding efforts will come as the area faces a construction labor shortage and rising costs for home-building materials, a situation exacerbated by hurricane recovery efforts in Texas and Florida, said Robert Eyler, an economics professor at Sonoma State.

    Thousands displaced by Northern California’s wildfires now face the region’s housing shortage

    Rebuilding efforts will come as the area faces a construction labor shortage and rising costs for home-building materials, a situation exacerbated by hurricane recovery efforts in Texas and Florida, said Robert Eyler, an economics professor at Sonoma State.

  • “In economics, we call it a primal problem, based on the natural instinct to gain as much as you can. Capitalism at its finest," said Robert Eyler, a Sonoma State University economist.

    Authorities issue alert on price gouging in fire areas

    “In economics, we call it a primal problem, based on the natural instinct to gain as much as you can. Capitalism at its finest," said Robert Eyler, a Sonoma State University economist.

  • Economist Robert Eyler, Ph.D., president of Forensic Analytics and dean of the Sonoma State University School of Education and International Studies, sees the future as involving three major issues: reconstruction, where and what groups of people will rebuild, and the timeline for accomplishing this enormous undertaking. “Many who have lived in the area for a number of years may profit from rising equity and valuation of their homes and will benefit from insurance payouts. However, some may decide to leave the region to start over. The magnitude of this go, or don’t leave the area, approach will be strongly felt here locally.”

    Economic impact of the Napa, Sonoma, Mendocino fires

    Economist Robert Eyler, Ph.D., president of Forensic Analytics and dean of the Sonoma State University School of Education and International Studies, sees the future as involving three major issues: reconstruction, where and what groups of people will rebuild, and the timeline for accomplishing this enormous undertaking. “Many who have lived in the area for a number of years may profit from rising equity and valuation of their homes and will benefit from insurance payouts. However, some may decide to leave the region to start over. The magnitude of this go, or don’t leave the area, approach will be strongly felt here locally.”

  • “It definitely is unprecedented for the county,” said Sonoma State University economist Robert Eyler. Such a combined impact to residents and businesses “has not been seen in at least two or three generations.”

    Fires deliver economic blow to Sonoma County businesses, workers

    “It definitely is unprecedented for the county,” said Sonoma State University economist Robert Eyler. Such a combined impact to residents and businesses “has not been seen in at least two or three generations.”

  • “If you’re a homeowner, you’re going to reassess your life as a result of this event, and if you are a developer you are going to look at all your options,” Robert Eyler, a professor of economics at Sonoma State University, said. “Homeowners will have tough choices to make."

    Construction labor shortage will slow post-fire rebuilding efforts

    “If you’re a homeowner, you’re going to reassess your life as a result of this event, and if you are a developer you are going to look at all your options,” Robert Eyler, a professor of economics at Sonoma State University, said. “Homeowners will have tough choices to make."

  • Robert Eyler, Economic Forensics & Analytics

    Solano County polishes ‘business first’ message

    Robert Eyler, Ph.D., president of Petaluma-based Economic Forensics and Analytics and professor of economics at Sonoma State University, says “Retail and construction were larger contributors before 2010 and are likely to become a larger part of the Solano County economy as the recovery continues."

The financial, retail, and labor markets are key indicators of economic health and trajectory. Dr. Robert Eyler discusses the state of these markets, how the California economy fits into the national and global picture, and what these updates mean for your business.

Robert Eyler Featured Speaker at NELSONtalks Business: Sacramento

April 29, 2016

The financial, retail, and labor markets are key indicators of economic health and trajectory. Dr. Robert Eyler discusses the state of these markets, how the California economy fits into the national and global picture, and what these updates mean for your business.

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Napa County will share an economic report on how fast the local wage might be increased without unduly hurting businesses. But that economic report by Robert Eyler of Economic Forensics & Analytics didn’t recommend a faster ramp-up to $15 than the state is taking.

Child advocates say higher wages, affordable housing needed

April 28, 2016

Napa County will share an economic report on how fast the local wage might be increased without unduly hurting businesses. But that economic report by Robert Eyler of Economic Forensics & Analytics didn’t recommend a faster ramp-up to $15 than the state is taking.

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Sonoma State University economics professor Robert Eyler released a private study in December that found an economic benefit when shoppers buy local at Oliver’s Market compared to purchasing national brand products sold at a chain store headquartered outside the county.

Sonoma County’s Go Local expands amid growing pains

April 25, 2016

Sonoma State University economics professor Robert Eyler released a private study in December that found an economic benefit when shoppers buy local at Oliver’s Market compared to purchasing national brand products sold at a chain store headquartered outside the county.

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With recreational marijuana legalization looming, a local economic expert advised Mendocino County business leaders Friday to position the area to become known for “wine, food and weed.” “Because if you don’t, someone else will,” Robert Eyler, economics professor at Sonoma State University and director of the Center for Regional Economic Analysis

Wine, waves & weed? Economics expert advises Ukiah to plan for pot tourism

April 18, 2016

With recreational marijuana legalization looming, a local economic expert advised Mendocino County business leaders Friday to position the area to become known for “wine, food and weed.” “Because if you don’t, someone else will,” Robert Eyler, economics professor at Sonoma State University and director of the Center for Regional Economic Analysis, told the group gathered at the Ukiah Valley Conference Center April 15 for the 2016 Agriculture Business Coalition Economic Outlook.

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The Board heard a report done for the county by Robert Eyler of Economic Forensics and Analytics. Eyler talked about trying to increase the minimum wage from the current $10 an hour to a level where the benefits still outweigh the costs.

Napa County defers to new state minimum wage law

April 6, 2016

The Board heard a report done for the county by Robert Eyler of Economic Forensics and Analytics. Eyler talked about trying to increase the minimum wage from the current $10 an hour to a level where the benefits still outweigh the costs.

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Sonoma State University economist Robert Eyler said that a .6 percent growth rate is what should be expected in a small quasi-rural county. Eyler theorized that Napa County grew more slowly than regional neighbors because of housing prices or lack of housing.

Napa population rises slowly

April 4, 2016

Sonoma State University economist Robert Eyler said that a .6 percent growth rate is what should be expected in a small quasi-rural county. Eyler theorized that Napa County grew more slowly than regional neighbors because of housing prices or lack of housing.

Full Story »