Economic Forensics & Analytics is an independent research and consulting firm located in Sonoma County, California. Since our conception in 2000, we’ve been dedicated to providing clients with customized economic analysis. We have a wide range of clientele in the private and public sectors throughout the state.

  • Mendocino

    Ukiah Daily Journal: The Commerce File

    Members of the North Coast Builders Exchange, the Mendocino County Farm Bureau and the Employers Council of Mendocino County heard a presentation Friday from Dr. Robert Eyler a professor of economics at Sonoma State University. Here in a nutshell is what he said:

  • Report: Solano economy beyond recovery, into expansion

    “One of the things that is the theme of this report is the idea that we have now moved beyond recovery and are in what we think, or what economists call, economic expansion,” said Robert Eyler, principal of Economic Forensics and Analytics. He will present his report at Solano EDC breakfast Friday at the Hilton Garden Inn, 2200 Gateway Court.

  • County’s economic health topic of breakfast session

    Robert Eyler, principal of Economic Forensics and Analytics, will give the keynote talk to unveil the Solano County 2014 Index of Economic and Community Progress to the business community.

  • efaFBbanner1.jpg

    Report projects economic growth for Solano County

    Solano County has experienced continued economic growth and an expanding economic base, according to a new economic and community progress report prepared by Robert Eyler of Economic Forensics and Analytics in Petaluma.

  • SSU Conference 2015

    SSU Economic Outlook Conference 2015

    By Gary QuackenbushNorth Bay Business Journal
    The 22nd annual Sonoma State University Economic Outlook Conference on Feb. 25, 2015, co-hosted by the Journal and Bank

  • North Bay diversity

    Economist: North Bay economic diversity key to growth

    “2015 looks to be another growth year for the local, state and national economies,” Dr. Eyler said. “The declining price of a barrel of oil has been making headlines, and gas prices at the pump went down to levels not seen since late 2008.”

Mendocino

Ukiah Daily Journal: The Commerce File

March 19, 2015

Members of the North Coast Builders Exchange, the Mendocino County Farm Bureau and the Employers Council of Mendocino County heard a presentation Friday from Dr. Robert Eyler a professor of economics at Sonoma State University. Here in a nutshell is what he said:

Full Story »

Report: Solano economy beyond recovery, into expansion

March 12, 2015

“One of the things that is the theme of this report is the idea that we have now moved beyond recovery and are in what we think, or what economists call, economic expansion,” said Robert Eyler, principal of Economic Forensics and Analytics. He will present his report at Solano EDC breakfast Friday at the Hilton Garden Inn, 2200 Gateway Court.

Full Story »

County’s economic health topic of breakfast session

March 10, 2015

Robert Eyler, principal of Economic Forensics and Analytics, will give the keynote talk to unveil the Solano County 2014 Index of Economic and Community Progress to the business community.

Full Story »

efaFBbanner1.jpg

Report projects economic growth for Solano County

March 9, 2015

Solano County has experienced continued economic growth and an expanding economic base, according to a new economic and community progress report prepared by Robert Eyler of Economic Forensics and Analytics in Petaluma.

Full Story »

SSU Conference 2015

SSU Economic Outlook Conference 2015

March 4, 2015

By Gary QuackenbushNorth Bay Business Journal
The 22nd annual Sonoma State University Economic Outlook Conference on Feb. 25, 2015, co-hosted by the Journal and Bank

Full Story »

North Bay diversity

Economist: North Bay economic diversity key to growth

February 27, 2015

“2015 looks to be another growth year for the local, state and national economies,” Dr. Eyler said. “The declining price of a barrel of oil has been making headlines, and gas prices at the pump went down to levels not seen since late 2008.”

Full Story »