Economic Forensics & Analytics is an independent research and consulting firm located in Sonoma County, California. Since our conception in 2000, we’ve been dedicated to providing clients with customized economic analysis. We have a wide range of clientele in the private and public sectors throughout the state.

  • Increased labor costs and a surge in housing demand are forecast for Marin following the devastating North Bay fires. “These markets are regional,” said Robert Eyler, chief economist of the Marin Economic Forum and a professor at Sonoma State University. “Because they’re regional, Marin County is not on an island when things happen. Things in Sonoma County can reverberate into Marin County.”

    Marin economic observers weigh North Bay fire impact

    Increased labor costs and a surge in housing demand are forecast for Marin following the devastating North Bay fires. “These markets are regional,” said Robert Eyler, chief economist of the Marin Economic Forum and a professor at Sonoma State University. “Because they’re regional, Marin County is not on an island when things happen. Things in Sonoma County can reverberate into Marin County.”

  • Robert Eyler, an economist at Sonoma State University, valued the Napa and Sonoma wine business at over $10 billion in annual sales, and he estimated that billions more were generated by enotourism. “The fire, even though it was relatively large in acreage, was still relatively concentrated in specific areas,” he said. Many hotels, bed and breakfasts, and wineries survived intact and were not affected by the fires.

    Outlook good for California wine lovers

    Robert Eyler, an economist at Sonoma State University, valued the Napa and Sonoma wine business at over $10 billion in annual sales, and he estimated that billions more were generated by enotourism. “The fire, even though it was relatively large in acreage, was still relatively concentrated in specific areas,” he said. Many hotels, bed and breakfasts, and wineries survived intact and were not affected by the fires.

  • According to Robert Eyler, a professor of economics at Sonoma State University, it is as yet unclear exactly what effect the fires will have on Napa’s wine business, which, together with Sonoma County’s, generates over $10 billion in annual sales and brings in billions of dollars more in tourism. “We don’t know yet how many vineyards have been impacted,” Eyler says, adding that the region will likely spend many months assessing the damage to harvests.

    Thousands of Jobs Depend on the Wine Industry’s Uncertain Recovery

    Rebuilding efforts will come as the area faces a construction labor shortage and rising costs for home-building materials, a situation exacerbated by hurricane recovery efforts in Texas and Florida, said Robert Eyler, an economics professor at Sonoma State.

  • Rebuilding efforts will come as the area faces a construction labor shortage and rising costs for home-building materials, a situation exacerbated by hurricane recovery efforts in Texas and Florida, said Robert Eyler, an economics professor at Sonoma State.

    Thousands displaced by Northern California’s wildfires now face the region’s housing shortage

    Rebuilding efforts will come as the area faces a construction labor shortage and rising costs for home-building materials, a situation exacerbated by hurricane recovery efforts in Texas and Florida, said Robert Eyler, an economics professor at Sonoma State.

  • “In economics, we call it a primal problem, based on the natural instinct to gain as much as you can. Capitalism at its finest," said Robert Eyler, a Sonoma State University economist.

    Authorities issue alert on price gouging in fire areas

    “In economics, we call it a primal problem, based on the natural instinct to gain as much as you can. Capitalism at its finest," said Robert Eyler, a Sonoma State University economist.

  • Economist Robert Eyler, Ph.D., president of Forensic Analytics and dean of the Sonoma State University School of Education and International Studies, sees the future as involving three major issues: reconstruction, where and what groups of people will rebuild, and the timeline for accomplishing this enormous undertaking. “Many who have lived in the area for a number of years may profit from rising equity and valuation of their homes and will benefit from insurance payouts. However, some may decide to leave the region to start over. The magnitude of this go, or don’t leave the area, approach will be strongly felt here locally.”

    Economic impact of the Napa, Sonoma, Mendocino fires

    Economist Robert Eyler, Ph.D., president of Forensic Analytics and dean of the Sonoma State University School of Education and International Studies, sees the future as involving three major issues: reconstruction, where and what groups of people will rebuild, and the timeline for accomplishing this enormous undertaking. “Many who have lived in the area for a number of years may profit from rising equity and valuation of their homes and will benefit from insurance payouts. However, some may decide to leave the region to start over. The magnitude of this go, or don’t leave the area, approach will be strongly felt here locally.”

Increased labor costs and a surge in housing demand are forecast for Marin following the devastating North Bay fires. “These markets are regional,” said Robert Eyler, chief economist of the Marin Economic Forum and a professor at Sonoma State University. “Because they’re regional, Marin County is not on an island when things happen. Things in Sonoma County can reverberate into Marin County.”

Marin economic observers weigh North Bay fire impact

October 26, 2017

Increased labor costs and a surge in housing demand are forecast for Marin following the devastating North Bay fires. “These markets are regional,” said Robert Eyler, chief economist of the Marin Economic Forum and a professor at Sonoma State University. “Because they’re regional, Marin County is not on an island when things happen. Things in Sonoma County can reverberate into Marin County.”

Full Story »

Robert Eyler, an economist at Sonoma State University, valued the Napa and Sonoma wine business at over $10 billion in annual sales, and he estimated that billions more were generated by enotourism. “The fire, even though it was relatively large in acreage, was still relatively concentrated in specific areas,” he said. Many hotels, bed and breakfasts, and wineries survived intact and were not affected by the fires.

Outlook good for California wine lovers

October 26, 2017

Robert Eyler, an economist at Sonoma State University, valued the Napa and Sonoma wine business at over $10 billion in annual sales, and he estimated that billions more were generated by enotourism. “The fire, even though it was relatively large in acreage, was still relatively concentrated in specific areas,” he said. Many hotels, bed and breakfasts, and wineries survived intact and were not affected by the fires.

Full Story »

According to Robert Eyler, a professor of economics at Sonoma State University, it is as yet unclear exactly what effect the fires will have on Napa’s wine business, which, together with Sonoma County’s, generates over $10 billion in annual sales and brings in billions of dollars more in tourism. “We don’t know yet how many vineyards have been impacted,” Eyler says, adding that the region will likely spend many months assessing the damage to harvests.

Thousands of Jobs Depend on the Wine Industry’s Uncertain Recovery

October 23, 2017

Rebuilding efforts will come as the area faces a construction labor shortage and rising costs for home-building materials, a situation exacerbated by hurricane recovery efforts in Texas and Florida, said Robert Eyler, an economics professor at Sonoma State.

Full Story »

Rebuilding efforts will come as the area faces a construction labor shortage and rising costs for home-building materials, a situation exacerbated by hurricane recovery efforts in Texas and Florida, said Robert Eyler, an economics professor at Sonoma State.

Thousands displaced by Northern California’s wildfires now face the region’s housing shortage

October 19, 2017

Rebuilding efforts will come as the area faces a construction labor shortage and rising costs for home-building materials, a situation exacerbated by hurricane recovery efforts in Texas and Florida, said Robert Eyler, an economics professor at Sonoma State.

Full Story »

“In economics, we call it a primal problem, based on the natural instinct to gain as much as you can. Capitalism at its finest," said Robert Eyler, a Sonoma State University economist.

Authorities issue alert on price gouging in fire areas

October 19, 2017

“In economics, we call it a primal problem, based on the natural instinct to gain as much as you can. Capitalism at its finest,” said Robert Eyler, a Sonoma State University economist.

Full Story »

Economist Robert Eyler, Ph.D., president of Forensic Analytics and dean of the Sonoma State University School of Education and International Studies, sees the future as involving three major issues: reconstruction, where and what groups of people will rebuild, and the timeline for accomplishing this enormous undertaking. “Many who have lived in the area for a number of years may profit from rising equity and valuation of their homes and will benefit from insurance payouts. However, some may decide to leave the region to start over. The magnitude of this go, or don’t leave the area, approach will be strongly felt here locally.”

Economic impact of the Napa, Sonoma, Mendocino fires

October 17, 2017

Economist Robert Eyler, Ph.D., president of Forensic Analytics and dean of the Sonoma State University School of Education and International Studies, sees the future as involving three major issues: reconstruction, where and what groups of people will rebuild, and the timeline for accomplishing this enormous undertaking. “Many who have lived in the area for a number of years may profit from rising equity and valuation of their homes and will benefit from insurance payouts. However, some may decide to leave the region to start over. The magnitude of this go, or don’t leave the area, approach will be strongly felt here locally.”

Full Story »