Economic Forensics & Analytics is an independent research and consulting firm located in Sonoma County, California. Since our conception in 2000, we’ve been dedicated to providing clients with customized economic analysis. We have a wide range of clientele in the private and public sectors throughout the state.

  • Rebuilding efforts will come as the area faces a construction labor shortage and rising costs for home-building materials, a situation exacerbated by hurricane recovery efforts in Texas and Florida, said Robert Eyler, an economics professor at Sonoma State.

    Thousands displaced by Northern California’s wildfires now face the region’s housing shortage

    Rebuilding efforts will come as the area faces a construction labor shortage and rising costs for home-building materials, a situation exacerbated by hurricane recovery efforts in Texas and Florida, said Robert Eyler, an economics professor at Sonoma State.

  • “In economics, we call it a primal problem, based on the natural instinct to gain as much as you can. Capitalism at its finest," said Robert Eyler, a Sonoma State University economist.

    Authorities issue alert on price gouging in fire areas

    “In economics, we call it a primal problem, based on the natural instinct to gain as much as you can. Capitalism at its finest," said Robert Eyler, a Sonoma State University economist.

  • Economist Robert Eyler, Ph.D., president of Forensic Analytics and dean of the Sonoma State University School of Education and International Studies, sees the future as involving three major issues: reconstruction, where and what groups of people will rebuild, and the timeline for accomplishing this enormous undertaking. “Many who have lived in the area for a number of years may profit from rising equity and valuation of their homes and will benefit from insurance payouts. However, some may decide to leave the region to start over. The magnitude of this go, or don’t leave the area, approach will be strongly felt here locally.”

    Economic impact of the Napa, Sonoma, Mendocino fires

    Economist Robert Eyler, Ph.D., president of Forensic Analytics and dean of the Sonoma State University School of Education and International Studies, sees the future as involving three major issues: reconstruction, where and what groups of people will rebuild, and the timeline for accomplishing this enormous undertaking. “Many who have lived in the area for a number of years may profit from rising equity and valuation of their homes and will benefit from insurance payouts. However, some may decide to leave the region to start over. The magnitude of this go, or don’t leave the area, approach will be strongly felt here locally.”

  • “It definitely is unprecedented for the county,” said Sonoma State University economist Robert Eyler. Such a combined impact to residents and businesses “has not been seen in at least two or three generations.”

    Fires deliver economic blow to Sonoma County businesses, workers

    “It definitely is unprecedented for the county,” said Sonoma State University economist Robert Eyler. Such a combined impact to residents and businesses “has not been seen in at least two or three generations.”

  • “If you’re a homeowner, you’re going to reassess your life as a result of this event, and if you are a developer you are going to look at all your options,” Robert Eyler, a professor of economics at Sonoma State University, said. “Homeowners will have tough choices to make."

    Construction labor shortage will slow post-fire rebuilding efforts

    “If you’re a homeowner, you’re going to reassess your life as a result of this event, and if you are a developer you are going to look at all your options,” Robert Eyler, a professor of economics at Sonoma State University, said. “Homeowners will have tough choices to make."

  • Robert Eyler, Economic Forensics & Analytics

    Solano County polishes ‘business first’ message

    Robert Eyler, Ph.D., president of Petaluma-based Economic Forensics and Analytics and professor of economics at Sonoma State University, says “Retail and construction were larger contributors before 2010 and are likely to become a larger part of the Solano County economy as the recovery continues."

Rebuilding efforts will come as the area faces a construction labor shortage and rising costs for home-building materials, a situation exacerbated by hurricane recovery efforts in Texas and Florida, said Robert Eyler, an economics professor at Sonoma State.

Thousands displaced by Northern California’s wildfires now face the region’s housing shortage

October 19, 2017

Rebuilding efforts will come as the area faces a construction labor shortage and rising costs for home-building materials, a situation exacerbated by hurricane recovery efforts in Texas and Florida, said Robert Eyler, an economics professor at Sonoma State.

Full Story »

“In economics, we call it a primal problem, based on the natural instinct to gain as much as you can. Capitalism at its finest," said Robert Eyler, a Sonoma State University economist.

Authorities issue alert on price gouging in fire areas

October 19, 2017

“In economics, we call it a primal problem, based on the natural instinct to gain as much as you can. Capitalism at its finest,” said Robert Eyler, a Sonoma State University economist.

Full Story »

Economist Robert Eyler, Ph.D., president of Forensic Analytics and dean of the Sonoma State University School of Education and International Studies, sees the future as involving three major issues: reconstruction, where and what groups of people will rebuild, and the timeline for accomplishing this enormous undertaking. “Many who have lived in the area for a number of years may profit from rising equity and valuation of their homes and will benefit from insurance payouts. However, some may decide to leave the region to start over. The magnitude of this go, or don’t leave the area, approach will be strongly felt here locally.”

Economic impact of the Napa, Sonoma, Mendocino fires

October 17, 2017

Economist Robert Eyler, Ph.D., president of Forensic Analytics and dean of the Sonoma State University School of Education and International Studies, sees the future as involving three major issues: reconstruction, where and what groups of people will rebuild, and the timeline for accomplishing this enormous undertaking. “Many who have lived in the area for a number of years may profit from rising equity and valuation of their homes and will benefit from insurance payouts. However, some may decide to leave the region to start over. The magnitude of this go, or don’t leave the area, approach will be strongly felt here locally.”

Full Story »

“It definitely is unprecedented for the county,” said Sonoma State University economist Robert Eyler. Such a combined impact to residents and businesses “has not been seen in at least two or three generations.”

Fires deliver economic blow to Sonoma County businesses, workers

October 17, 2017

“It definitely is unprecedented for the county,” said Sonoma State University economist Robert Eyler. Such a combined impact to residents and businesses “has not been seen in at least two or three generations.”

Full Story »

“If you’re a homeowner, you’re going to reassess your life as a result of this event, and if you are a developer you are going to look at all your options,” Robert Eyler, a professor of economics at Sonoma State University, said. “Homeowners will have tough choices to make."

Construction labor shortage will slow post-fire rebuilding efforts

October 17, 2017

“If you’re a homeowner, you’re going to reassess your life as a result of this event, and if you are a developer you are going to look at all your options,” Robert Eyler, a professor of economics at Sonoma State University, said. “Homeowners will have tough choices to make.”

Full Story »

Robert Eyler, Economic Forensics & Analytics

Solano County polishes ‘business first’ message

February 24, 2017

Robert Eyler, Ph.D., president of Petaluma-based Economic Forensics and Analytics and professor of economics at Sonoma State University, says “Retail and construction were larger contributors before 2010 and are likely to become a larger part of the Solano County economy as the recovery continues.”

Full Story »